Tag Archives: Kids

Softies for Mirabel

Hello friends!  I’ve been away from this particular screen for a long while.  Moving house (back to my old place…hooray!), and still unpacking and organising (mostly solo with the addition of two pairs of small helping hands) being the major excuses.

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Anyway, this is intended to be a brief post as I’m exhausted after celebrating Miss L’s fifth birthday with a wonderful farmyard-themed birthday party (more to come on this soon I hope). I have just packaged up this year’s contribution to Softies for Mirabel, ready for her journey to Melbourne tomorrow.  She is a softie doll named ‘Sophie’ who I created several months ago using vintage, reclaimed and remnant fabrics, 100% wool felt and recycled polyester stuffing.  Sophie has her own sleeping bag and pillow, which might come in handy for the trip I guess.  

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Somewhere there is a child who is going to meet Sophie and hopefully become her pal, some time after Christmas.  Thanks to the work of the Mirabel Foundation, an organisation based in Melbourne, that assists children who are affected by parental substance abuse.  The toy drive was the brainchild of the totally awesome, Pip Lincolne of Meet Me at Mikes.  Crafters from across the globe send in their handmade (sewn, knitted or crocheted) toys which are then matched to a Mirabel child for Christmas.  Last year I sent a toy in for the first time – a cat named Ginger.  He was based on a design that my daughter drew when she was three.

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I had planned to write this post to promote the 2013 Softies for Mirabel toy drive.  But I’m a tad late.  I only discovered tonight that the deadline for posted toys to be in is November 30 (Sophie should just make it)!  Anyway, that should give any crafty types who are reading this plenty of time to whip up a handmade toy for next year.

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Filed under Green Craft, Kids Stuff

Weekly Upcycling Inspiration: The Cardboard Box

Welcome to your weekly serving of upcycling inspiration! Once a week I’m going to feature an item for which I’ll endeavour to list some upcycling ideas. They might be my own or they might just be little light bulbs of genius that I pinch from someone else.

Cardboard boxes are incredibly useful for their intended purpose of storage and transport of goods. And they can be reused in this way over and over again. Plus they are completely recyclable and biodegradable (minus any sticky tape). We love cardboard boxes in our household as they are a wonderful resource for kids play. There is always a supply on hand ready for a rainy day!

1. If you haven’t visited my Makedo Creations page yet, then go on, take a peak. I hope you’ll be inspired by what my husband and daughter have made with boxes and other recyclables and trash. Here is their latest creation…a checkout.

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Complete with conveyor belt, scanner, monitor, scales, eftpos machine and packing area it’s been a popular play area for the children for the past couple of weeks. It uses only boxes and Makedo connectors plus an old mobile phone (eftpos machine) and real scales.

2. Use to suppress or kill weeds and grasses under a thick layer of mulch. Overlap pieces of opened out cardboard box on the area to be mulched, wet down then apply mulch. This is also a great way to smother grasses when building a no-dig garden bed or other raised garden beds onto a patch of lawn.

3. When wrapping odd-shaped gifts place the items in a box then wrap (reuse wrapping paper and other papers, fabric, etc). It will be much easier and neater.

4. Make an office in-box by cutting off one large side and the top. Cut the end of the narrow sides on an angle. Cover in decorative or interesting paper or fabric.

5. Make a magazine holder with a sturdy cereal box.

6. Place strategically under furniture when rearranging it, to protect the floor and make it easier to slide.

7. Entertain your pooch. Fill smaller boxes such as cereal boxes with dry dog food or treats, close then give to your dog to rip apart. This is a fabulous way to feed an active or young dog who needs lots of stimulation. Rather than gobbling up the food in a flash, your dog will spend extra time extracting the food and tearing up the box. The pieces of torn cardboard can later be placed on the compost.

8. Make a sled for snow or a grassy slope.

9. Protect fingers when hammering a nail. Push the nail through one end of a rectangular-ish piece of cardboard and hold onto the other end once you commence hammering. Remove cardboard then complete the hammering if necessary.

10. When transporting furniture and household items in a vehicle or trailer, use pieces of cardboard box placed flat against the items to protect against damage from rubbing and to help hold them in place. Use small pieces under ropes, again to stop rubbing but also to help secure the items when the rope is tightened.

Of course if you are a cat (or live with one) then you know what the best use for a cardboard box is, don’t you? No need to waste precious energy on upcycling. 🙂

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Filed under Green Craft, Kids Stuff, Living Green

Getting Kids’ Hands Dirty…In the Garden

I’m not sure what incited my passion for gardening.  Perhaps it was the special times spent in my great grandmother’s sprawling garden with its tasty fruit and vegies, and delightful flowers at every turn.   Or the array of potted succulents and flowering perennials at Grandma’s back door that cheerfully greeted me on arrival. Or joining my dad in his vegie plot when I was just a wee one.  Maybe it was the little vegie and flower garden that my first-grade classmates and I created in primary school.   Probably ‘all of the above’ is how I came to be a green thumb.  Growing plants (especially edible ones) has excited me for as long as I can remember and I have many fond memories of being amongst them.

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I totally agree with Australian gardening legend Peter Cundall, that gardening is super beneficial to our health – not only from a physical aspect, but also for the mind.  And there’s the bonus of nourishing your body with a bounty of fresh fruit and vegies from the edible garden.   Whether you’re four-years-old or eighty-four, the merits of gardening hold true.    Encouraging kids when they’re small will help to start them on this wonderful journey.

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Here are some ideas on how to pass on the gardening bug to kids:

– Garden with your kids from their very beginning.  My daughter joined me in the garden as a newborn –  carried in a sling, resting in the pram or on a blanket.

– Provide child-sized tools and gloves.  Miss L has shown a heightened interest in gardening since receiving some lovely gardening tools for Christmas last year!

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– Give your child her own garden area, whether it’s a small pot or an entire raised vegie bed.  Making a sign for this, eg, ‘Sophie’s Patch’ can also be a fun activity to do together.  With some gentle guidance and depending on her age, allow her to choose what is planted and to do the planting herself (again with some help if needed).  Try to avoid the urge to take over.  For younger kids you might let them pick from a selection of seeds that you’ve chosen based on season and ease of growing, show them how to sow the seeds and help them to do it.  Older kids could be given the task of choosing suitable seeds and then planting these themselves.

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– Try to keep gardening sessions short.  Take your child’s cue – if he tells you he’s had enough then it’s time to stop.

– Develop their sense of wonder for the natural world.  Whenever you or your child sees something noteworthy in nature, even if you’re just walking along a suburban footpath, take the time to stop, examine closely and show interest and amazement: ’Wow!  Look at that caterpillar!  I wonder why it’s covered in all those hairs?’…’Can you see that bird over there?  The one with the white cheek and red face.  What other colours can you see on its body?’…’Oh fabulous!  Look at all these worms I’ve uncovered!  They are doing such a wonderful job keeping the soil healthy for our plants to grow!’…’Come and see!  Our beans have sprouted!’   You might feel that you’re sounding a bit like the late Steve Irwin, but your kids will pick up on your enthusiasm.  (I’ve no doubt Steve converted thousands of viewers into serious nature-lovers with his contagious passion)!  This helps kids learn to appreciate and even love, the many critters they might come across whilst gardening, that might otherwise incite fear or disgust and also keeps them interested in the biology of what is happening in the garden.

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– Avoid pressuring your child to garden…if they don’t want to garden at a particular time, that’s fine.  And try not to worry (at least pretend you’re not concerned) when the seeds aren’t in perfect little rows and neatly spaced, or they are planted a little too deep, or your child pulls out a young vegie seedling thinking it’s a weed!

– Do some gardening-based craft.  Decorate old containers (tin cans, canisters, cups) to be used as pots.  Make a scarecrow.  Paint rocks for signs and decoration. Create garden sculptures.

– Read about gardening…together…no matter how young (or old) your kids are.  We especially like The Australian Women’s Weekly Kids in the Garden, by Mary Moody and The Little Gardeners Guide, by Niki Horin.  But even your regular gardening books, magazines and catalogues can capture children’s attention as they are filled with lovely, colourful and often fascinating pictures.

– Harvest and eat your produce together.  Allow kids to help with the preparation, even if it’s just washing the carrots or lettuce.  Little hands are also ideal for fiddly jobs like shelling peas!

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I’m pretty sure my daughter, at four years of age, has caught the gardening craze.  Miss L chose The Little Gardeners Guide for us to read this morning.  On our walk she noted our neighbour’s lawn still hadn’t grown properly over a little defect that they’d filled with soil recently.  When we returned home Miss L insisted she go outside and water the plants, even though the soil was still wet from this morning’s downpour.  Then Miss L asked if she could plant some seeds.  Which she did.  Not before gathering her entire gardening tool collection and donning gardening gloves and hat…and treating the soil to lashings of home-made compost.  I’m pretty stoked that my daughter loves gardening.  But what made me smile tonight was that Miss L not only devoured all of her vegies at dinner, but she also ate the little mound of mint leaves on the side.  And declared them to be ‘delicious’.  I shouldn’t be surprised.  She  grew them herself!

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